After Nehru Indira Modi is only PM to return to power with

first_imgNew Delhi: After Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi, Narendra Modi is the third prime minister of the country who has been able to retain power for a second term with full majority in Lok Sabha.As counting goes on across the country on Thursday, trends show the Modi-led BJP would be easily able to cross the halfway mark of 272 seats in the 17th Lok Sabha elections. In 2014, the BJP had won 282 seats out of total 543 in Lok Sabha. Jawaharlal Nehru won around three-fourth of the Lok Sabha seats in the first elections in the country during 1951-52. Subsequently, he was able to win 1957 elections as well as 1962 elections with full majority. Also Read – Pak activated 20 terror camps & 20 launch pads along LoCSince the elections were happening for the first time in the independent India in 1951, the polling had to be spread over a period of five months from October 1951 to February 1952. While the Congress hegemony was insurmountable in 1951, various other political strands such as Bhartiya Jana Sangh, Kisaan Mazdoor Praja Party, Scheduled Caste Federation and Socialist Party had started to take shape by then. The Congress was able to win 364 out of 489 seats during 1951-52 elections. The party polled around 45 per cent of the total votes then. Also Read – Two squadrons which participated in Balakot airstrike awarded citationsIn 1957, when Nehru was up for re-election, India was going through a difficult phase as the PM was battling the right wing inside and outside his party after passage of the Hindu Marriage Act in 1955. The country was facing many language disputes. Consequently, after establishment of States Reorganisation Committee in 1953, many states were formed on the basis of language. The country was also feeling the heat due to food insecurity. However, among all this, Nehru was able to win a spectacular victory of 371 seats in 1957 elections. The Congress’s vote share even increased from 45 per cent in 1951-52 to 47.78 per cent in 1957. In 1962 elections, Nehru won again bagging 361 seats out of total 494 seats in Lok Sabha. After 20 years of Independence, the Congress’s hegemony in the country’s politics finally started breaking down in 1967 when it lost six state assembly elections. Out of this six, Tamil Nadu and West Bengal was lost by the Congress for the very first time. However, in 1967 elections, Nehru’s daughter Indira Gandhi was able to get 283 seats out of total 520 seats. This was Indira’s first electoral victory in general elections. In 1969, Indira expelled the old guard of the party, which were called as Congress (O). This section of Congress was led by Morarji Desai. It was during this time that Indira coined the slogan “Garibi hatao”, which found a wide emotive appeal among the Indian voters. As a result, she was able to increase her tally to 352 in 1971 elections for her second term. In between 2010 and 2014, with UPA government facing multiple allegations of massive corruption scandals, the BJP decided to appoint the then Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi as their Prime Minister candidate for 2014 general elections. With a promise of development (vikas) across India, Narendra Modi won his first ever general elections with full majority in 2014 with 282 seats.last_img read more

Stateless Rohingya refugee children living in untenable situation UNICEF chief

While the massive humanitarian effort so far – led by the Bangladesh Government with international support – has saved countless lives, these children are becoming increasingly anxious about their futures, and vulnerable to frustration and despair.“The obligation we have as a global society is immense: to give children and young people the world has defined as ‘stateless’, the education and skills they need to build decent lives for themselves,” said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore, after visiting the world’s largest and most congested refugee camp over two days earlier this week.With the right investment, the Rohingya can be an asset to their community and to the world — UNICEF chiefIn Myanmar, most Rohingya have no legal identity or citizenship, denied documentation by the Burmese Government. And since August 2017, when the vast majority were forced to flee for their lives from into Bangladesh, children are not being registered at birth. They lack any legal identity and official refugee status.Until conditions in Myanmar allow those eligible to return home, Rohingya children remain a minority without status, according to UNICEF. They are excluded from a formal education curriculum and in desperate need of skills. “Without a legal identity, they are at the mercy of traffickers and drug dealers”, said UN Humanitarian Envoy, Ahmed Al Meraikhi, who accompanied Ms. Fore.He stressed that we must agree collectively to “invest in this generation of Rohingya children, so that they can better navigate their lives today, and be a constructive part of rebuilding Myanmar’s social fabric when they are able to return”.Currently, UNICEF reaches 155,000 children ages 4-14 with a learning programme that progressively includes higher quality and more structured learning and skills.In 2019, it is prioritizing older adolescents to improve foundational literacy and numeracy, along with relevant vocational skills. The UN agency will also strongly focus on supporting the local host community in Cox’s Bazar, one of the poorest districts in Bangladesh.“This is crucial work, but a drop in the bucket of need. This is an untenable situation,” Ms. Fore said. “A generation of Rohingya children and young people cannot be left without the education and skills to build a life for themselves.”UNICEF Bangladesh is appealing for $152 million in 2019 to provide 685,000 Rohingya refugees and host community residents with critical support. As of February, it has received only 29 per cent of the funding.“If they become self-sustaining”, Ms. Fore asserted “their communities will also become self-sustaining and flourish”.“With the right investment, the Rohingya can be an asset to their community and to the world”, concluded the UNICEF chief. read more