Thursday Boots Debuts New Line Of Premium Leather Footwear

first_img 14 Scandinavian Clothing Brands You Need to Know To celebrate the New Year,  Thursday Boots is adding an exciting new assortment of boots to its already stellar line of practical, yet elegant, men’s footwear: The Black Label Collection.The latest collection features an array of hand-crafted, high-quality boots made of Shell Cordovan leather, a premium material that exemplifies the brand’s dedication to comfort, durability, high-performance and innovation.The exclusive Black Label Collection is composed entirely of  Shell Cordovan Vanguard style boots and will boast just 100 pairs of each colorway. The individual pairs are hand-numbered and come with a certificate of authenticity, ensuring that the boots are truly the only ones of their kind in the world.  This means once the shoes are sold, they’ll be out of stock for good.The exclusivity of the design is an inherent feature of its painstaking production process. The genuine Shell Cordovan leather comes from a single boutique tannery in Italy and is developed over the period of six months. This special attention results in a leather that is uniquely lustrous, durable and essentially impermeable from the elements, which makes it the ideal material for a long-lasting piece of footwear.Once the leather is developed, its sent to an artisan to be handmade into a vanguard boot for the Black Label Collection. The shoes are crafted in small batches featuring a resolable and virtually waterproof Veldtschoen Construction.In addition to the smooth, stylish finish of the cordovan leather, the boots include a glove leather lining, a cork midsole that adjusts to the foot over time, square leather laces and a studded rubber outersole. In keeping with the brand’s aesthetic, they’re as gorgeous as they are comfortable.The boots come in either a Whiskey or Burgundy finish and retail for $489. They’ll be available for purchase here starting January 19. How to Transition Your Wardrobe to Fall You Won’t Believe the Price Tags on 10 of the Most Expensive Shoes For Men Editors’ Recommendations Yes, You Can Wear Boots to the Office: Here are the Best Pairs Why Your Desk Chair Matters and the 9 Best Ones to Boost Your Productivitylast_img read more

Do mining companies have a social licence to operate

first_imgAustralian mining companies are employing a debatable and ill-defined concept to justify their presence in local communities, University of Melbourne research has established. “Mining companies are increasingly claiming to have a ‘social licence’ to operate in certain areas because of perceived benefits to the local community,” according to public policy analyst Dr Sara Bice. “But claims to this ‘licence’ are misleading because the term isn’t formally defined anywhere in law.”Dr Bice’s report, What Gives You A Social Licence?, is published in the current edition of the academic journal, Resources.The study examines how mining companies — including BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, Xstrata and MGM — conceptualise and define their own ‘social licence’, and voices concerns about how these ‘licences’ are applied in practice.“A traditional licence involves one party empowering another based upon certain conditions and responsibilities. But there are no established criteria for how mining companies and communities might broker a so-called ‘social license’.“Equally, there are no clear rules for how one might be revoked,” she said.Bice, who is based at the University’s Melbourne School of Government, said this lack of clarity negatively affects both resources companies and communities.“The language of licensing leads to confusion. It suggests a formality, and even regulation, which does not exist. In reality, a ‘social licence’ is purely metaphorical.”Bice argues both parties would benefit from greater clarity. “For corporations, better clarity on what their social licence really entails can help quell the ‘vocal minority’ who may engineer a backlash against operations,” she said.“At the same time, clear criteria would protect local communities from big corporations who may claim to hold a licence for which minimum standards have not been set.”last_img read more