How Saint-André plans to repay English rugby

first_img France coach Philippe Saint-AndréBy Gavin MortimerTHE Sunday Times ran a piece last weekend in which Rugby World’s very own Stephen Jones interviewed Philippe Saint-André. The coach of France was his normal affable self, buttering up the English ahead of Sunday’s encounter byacknowledging his “debt to England rugby” on account of the formative years he spent coaching at Gloucester and Sale. Then, breaking into a broad grin, he added: “Maybe the best way to say thanks, and to show them how well I was trained, is to beat them next Sunday at the Stade de France.”You wouldn’t bet against France beating England seven days after they drew 17-17 with Ireland at the same venue. But if they do it, it won’t be with the pace and panache that personified Saint-André’s 69-cap international career. The former winger – best remembered by English fans for his magnificent try at Twickenham in the 1991 Five Nations – was clearly impressed with what he learned in England because France so far this Six Nations have played in a style à les Anglais.There were times against Ireland when it felt like we weren’t watching France but rather an England XV circa 1994. Dominant in the scrum, destructive in the driving maul, impressive in the lineout…and appalling out wide, that best sums up France against the Irish.Beauxis attempts a drop-goalFly-half Francois Trinh-Duc and outside centre Aurelien Rougerie both had games to forget while Lionel Beauxis, a replacement for the final 12 minutes, hardly covered himself in glory when he butchered two attempts at dropped goals after great work by his pack. There can’t have been much bonhomie between the forwards and backs after the match, not when one unit (forwards) had striven so hard to secure victory only to see the other (backs) mess up time after time. Apparently French president Nicolas Sarkozy dropped into the dressing room after the Ireland game: perhaps his diplomacy skills were called upon… Modern rugby is all about ‘taking positives’ from matches so at least another try-scoring display from centre Wesley Fofana will have bucked up Saint-André. But he alone of the French threequarters has shown a cutting edge in this season’s Six Nations. Admittedly they ran in four tries against a poor Italy on the opening weekend but against Scotland the French were on the rack for long periods, and both their tries came from poor Scottish tackling. England won’t be as generous and their rush defence is likely to cause similar problems to the French as did Ireland’s.Thierry Dusautoir takes on Jonathan SextonSo from a French fan’s point of view, thank goodness for their pack and the strength of their set-piece. Loose forwards Thierry Dusautoir and Imanol Harinordoquy were outstanding against Ireland, second row Pascal Pape stood toe to toe against the great Paul O’Connell, and prop Jean Baptiste Poux gave Mike Ross an afternoon to forget in the scrum. not for featured LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England’s pack will be bracing themselves for more of the same on Sunday, knowing that if they can gain parity at the set-piece then their backs can cause problems out wide. Even at 20, Owen Farrell is a better and more rounded fly-half than Trinh-Duc (assuming Saint-André keeps faith with the Montpellier No 10), while Manu Tuilagi will allow us to see if Fofana’s defence is as good as his attack. The back three are evenly matched though England will look to exploit full-back Clement Poitrenaud’s flaky defence.Saint-André has talked of how the French players have a “ burning desire” to wear the French jersey, a message not too dissimilar from the one coming out of the English camp. Perhaps then Sunday’s clash will all come down to which team’s desire burns brightest.last_img read more

Top 14: High Noon

first_imgThe script may still have a final act to run. The game against Pau will be Noon’s 100th for Brive and all his family are coming over from England for the occasion. And among the 35,000-strong crowd in Bordeaux’s Stade Chaban-Delmas will be most of Brive, all willing Noon to go out on a high. not for featured Tearaway: former England centre Jamie Noon will hang up his boots at the end of this seasonBy Gavin Mortimer IT’S A funny old game, rugby, as Jamie Noon will testify. Son of Yorkshire, servant of Newcastle and now stalwart of Brive, the former England centre brings down the curtain on his professional career on Sunday, in Bordeaux of all places, about as far removed from Goole as you could wish to find. True, they’re both ports, but there’s not much sun, and even less wine, in the Yorkshire town where Noon was born 34 years ago.May day: young Falcon MayThe fact that he’s bowing out in Bordeaux, playing for Brive against Pau in the Pro2 play-off final, is proof of how far Noon has come – literally and metaphorically – since he first pulled on a Newcastle shirt in the late 1990s. Back then Noon was one of the Falcons’ young guns, that posse of precocious talent which included Jonny Wilkinson, Michael Stephenson, Dave Walder and Tom May. Now fifteen years of life as a professional sportsmen is about to end, and Noon is honest enough to admit he’s approaching the next phase of his life with more than a little trepidation. “I’m nervous,” he says. “As a professional rugby player you train, prepare and play, so you always know more or less what to expect out of life. Now I’m about to go into the unknown, trying to get a job against guys who are younger and carry degrees and other qualifications. I’m 34, with three young children to feed, so yes, definitely I’m nervous. On the plus side, however, as a professional sportsmen you live off a fierce competitive spirit, so I hope I can use that to flourish in a different arena.”Noon has plans, ambitious ones that are as bold as the manner in which he has graced the game for these past fifteen years. “I’m looking to become an agent,” he says, adding that he’s in the throes of obtaining his licence. But Noon wants to be more than just an agent. He aims to put his own vast experience to good use by mentoring young players as they make the transition from youth academy to professional club.Noon intends to remain in France, advising British and Irish players looking to move across the Channel while also taking aspiring French youngsters under his wing. There are opportunities to be had in France as club rugby continues to soar, ideal for a man who is now an unabashed Francophile. “It’s funny how it’s worked out,” he explains. “The kids (his three children are aged eight, six and four) found it really tough at first. There were a lot of tears and getting them to go to school each morning was hard. Now they love it. They’ve really adapted to the French way of life and my wife and I decided we couldn’t uproot them and take them back to England.”Noon loves the lifestyle, too, comparing the countryside around the rural town of Brive to that of his native Yorkshire, populated by a similar people with little pretension but an abundance of warmth. Noon has felt much of that warmth from the moment he arrived at Brive in the summer of 2009. He came with a big reputation, a hard-running centre with 38 England caps, just one of a number of English players recruited by Brive, among whom were Steve Thompson, Andy Goode, Shaun Perry and Riki Flutey.Super 10: Goode times at BriveReflecting on his first season at Brive (which resulted in Noon winning the coaches’ Player of the Year award), he says what helped him through was his philosophy. “I came with an open mind from the start. I struggled for the first couple of months but whereas some of the (English) boys got stressed and annoyed by certain things, I just thought I might as well go the French way. For eleven years in England I’d been really strict in my approach but in Brive I started drinking coffee – something we couldn’t do at Newcastle – and instead of living on brown pasta, rice and boiled chicken, I started eating what the French ate, which included steaks and a lot of cheese.”Whereas some of Noon’s fellow Englishmen were never able to bridge the difference in cultures, he thrived in his new environment, earning the respect and admiration of team-mates and fans as a consequence. Fitting, then, that it was Noon who scored the decisive try in Brive’s win against Aurillac last weekend, a victory that secured them the right to challenge Pau on Sunday for a place in next season’s Top 14.“That was a special moment,” reflects Noon. “It couldn’t have been better scripted, coming on for my last home game and scoring a try with my first touch that took us through to the final.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Six Nations: England 29-18 Wales

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – MARCH 09: Wales player Leigh Halfpenny (r) is led from the pitch after picking up an injury during the RBS Six Nations match between England and Wales at Twickenham Stadium on March 9, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) What next?Stuart Lancaster: “The win was right up there for us. We deserved the win. It was a different game to Ireland, which had more flow to it. Leigh Halfpenny kept Wales close for a long time. If Luther Burrell had gone in it could have been more. Jack Nowell, for a 20-year old kid facing that quality of opposition, was brilliant. Jonny May was also excellent.”England can travel to Rome as Triple Crown champions for the first time since 2003. They showed more enterprise than Wales, with Owen Farrell marshalling the England backs adroitly.England must go to Rome with the mindset that they can put 50 points on Italy to have a realistic hope of snatching the championship from Ireland, aware that Joe Schmidt’s men will know what is required as they kick off later.Stuart Lancaster was happy with England’s ambition. “We’ve tried to remove the fear factor and go out and play. Sometimes your heart is in your mouth a bit but we got our reward.”Man down: Halfpenny was injured late onAfter two losses in four games, Warren Gatland will need to ponder making changes to a settled side ready for 2015 but says ‘he isn’t in to making any emotional decisions so soon after the game’.Gatland said: “We hurt ourselves with the number of turnovers in the game. The second try came from a turnover and the first try was from a penalty. Potentially it was a Lions hang0ver, it’s been tough on these players with a Grand Slam, a Championship and a Lions Tour in 18 months but it’s professional sport and you have to get up for it.”Wales’ decision-making was poor. Three times they chose to kick behind the defence which didn’t come off. Their ball-handling was not up to scratch and several times they wrongly chose to release the ballOn the injury front, Leigh Halfpenny dislocated his shoulder and is likely to be out for the season. Rhys Webb has damaged his ankle but the seriousness is not known.Robin McBryde has said he will be addressing referee Romain Poite about his decisions at the scrums.RW’s proposed England side v Italy: Mike Brown; Jack Nowell, Luther Burrell, Billy Twelvetrees, Manu Tuilagi; Owen Farrell, Danny Care; Ben Morgan, Chris Robshaw (c), Tom Wood, Courtney Lawes, Joe Launchbury, David Wilson, Dylan Hartley, Joe Marler. RW’s proposed Wales side v Scotland: Liam Williams; George North, Jonathan Davies, Jamie Roberts, Alex Cuthbert;Dan Biggar, Mike Phillips; Toby Faletau, Justin Tipuric, Sam Warburton (c), Alun Wyn Jones, Jake Ball, Adam Jones, Richard Hibbard, Gethin Jenkins. It’s been a long time: England lift the Triple Crown for the first time in 11 years after beating WalesEngland 29-18 WalesThe match in 30 secondsEngland avenged their heavy defeat in Cardiff last year with a comprehensive win over a faltering Wales, winning a Triple Crown in the process. The reigning champions, Wales have failed to find their usual fluency in this tournament. The tone was set early on with Wales napping, Danny Care took a quick penalty and dived under the posts. Better was to come from England after 33 minutes when a Jonny May break set up up Billy Twelvetrees, who dinked the ball behind the Welsh defence and Luther Burrell crashed over in the corner.Touch down: Luther Burrell goes overIt was only Leigh Halfpenny’s unerring boot that kept Wales to a five-point deficit at the break 20-15. In the second half, a few more penalties from Owen Farrell, who kicked all his points, gave England an 11-point lead which they kept until the final whistle. Another monster penalty from Halfpenny was all Wales had to show from the second half and it was only the heroics of the Toulon-bound full-back that stopped Burrell adding a second try to a superb opening Six Nations campaign.England – Tries: Danny Care, Luther Burrell. Cons: Farrell (2). Penalties: Farrell (5).Wales – Penalties: Halfpenny (6).Post-match bulletinWales had a poor day handling wise. There were dropped passes from Priestland, Cuthbert, North and Tipuric which saw them lose possession and territory.England had the better tackle completion rate. They made 137 tackles, missing 19 (88%), compared to Wales’ 112 tackles made, and 24 missed. A completion rate of 82%Both sides made six clean breaks but England beat slightly more defenders, 24 to Wales’ 19.England ran 570 metres compared to Wales’ 420 metres.Individually Mike Brown ran furthest with 156 metres carried. He was followed by Jack Nowell with 104 metres and Jonny May with 80. George North was Wales’ best carrier with 85m carried. Cuthbert and Faletau were next with 46m and Priestland carried 45m.Tom Wood was England’s top tackler with 14 tackles but was on of five members of the pack to reach double figures (Morgan 13, Lawes 12, Robshaw 11, Hartley 10)Jake Ball and Sam Warburton were Wales’ top tacklers with 13 tackles each. Dan Lydiate made 12 and Alun Wyn Jones  10.last_img read more

French rugby seeks to return to normality

first_imgAfter the barbaric attacks of November 13, French rugby is attempting to move forward starting with Racing 92 hosting Toulouse in Paris European support: Leinster and Wasps pay their respectsNo club has been as marked by the outrages as Stade Francais. The Stade Jean Bouin is situated in central Paris and president Thomas Savare told Midi Olympique that the attacks had had a profound effect on everyone at the club. One of the physiotherapist’s lost a relative, and hooker Rémi Bonfils fled for his life after being caught up in the attacks on Le Petit Cambodge et Le Carillon that left 15 people dead.Explaining that only time will tell what impact the attacks will have on crowd numbers, Savare said that sport’s “conviviality and unity” can help in the healing process. “It’s important not to let ourselves be terrorised, not to shut ourselves away at home,” he added. “But to continue to live as normally as possible.” Standing together: French rugby is trying to come to terms with a more uncertain landscape Solidarity: Fans of Toulouse and Oyonnax show their togetherness after the Paris attacksAn option being considered for the impending Six Nations, when Italy, Ireland and England play in Paris, is opening the Stade de France earlier. “We want to avoid as much as possible crowds around the Stade and reduce the mass of people between the public transport exits and the stadium entrances,” explained Alain Doucet, secretary-general of the FFR. Doucet added that the 80 security staff usually on duty inside the Stade for major sporting events will be increased, possibly even doubled, as the FFR looks to “take all the necessary precautions to guarantee the smooth running of our matches.”Ensuring the safety of spectators is obviously paramount and the authorities – political and sporting – have been encouraging sports fans to get back to the terraces. “Return to normality,” Patrick Kanner, the Minister of Sport, has urged people. “The security has been reinforced…we’re carrying out our duties.”Leaving nothing to risk: Security has been high at all Top 14 groundsIt was a similar message from Robert Broussard, who said he was confident all the necessary security measures have been taken to ensure the safety of fans. “There’s no reason to stop coming to the stadiums,” Broussard told Midi Olympique. “If we do stop, it will be a victory for the enemies of democracy.”Nonetheless there is concern among some of the Top 14 clubs that crowd numbers will drop for the foreseeable future as fans stay away. Grenoble president Marc Chérèque admitted he was “worried” about the financial future, adding that ticket sales for Sunday’s home match against Stade Francais have stalled in the past 10 days. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Racing 92 host Toulouse on Saturday afternoon. It will be an emotional occasion, the first professional rugby match to be played in the Parisian region since the murderous ISIS attacks of November 13th, and a game that is suffused with hope. Hope for the city and its inhabitants, that life is slowly returning to normal, and hope in a sporting context for Racing, who will introduce Dan Carter to the Yves Du Manoir crowd prior to kick-off.The All Black World Cup winner will notice a subdued atmosphere in Paris when he arrives this week in the city he’s calling home for the next three years. Parisians are still going out, to theatres, shops, bars and restaurants, but visitor numbers have dropped dramatically with hotel bookings and flight reservations down by 35 % and 27% respectively from the period leading up to the attacks.The presence of soldiers and armed police on the streets adds to the sense of a city under siege but there are no plans to deploy them inside Paris’s sport stadiums despite the fact one of the ISIS terrorists squads targeted the France v Germany football friendly at the Stade de France.Superstar: Dan Carter will be unveiled to the Racing 92 fans on SaturdayIn an interview with Midi Olympique on Monday, Robert Broussard, the FFR vice-president responsible for security, explained that idea had been rejected. However, he added, there will be a greater police presence outside rugby stadiums and other “discreet” measures will be taken, “some of which will not be divulged”.The attack on the Stade de France, and the cancellation of the Germany v Holland match in Hanover last week because of terrorist concerns, has put sports stadia security under unprecedented scrutiny. “Zero risk doesn’t exist,” conceded Patrick Wolff, the vice-president of the LNR and the man responsible for stadia supervision. “The challenge is to adapt to an environment where 20,000 people are gathered [but] it’s extremely difficult to find a balance between people’s enjoyment and their security.”To illustrate his point, Wolff said they were considering removing bars and snack vans from outside grounds,an integral part of rugby’s sociability, but a sacrifice that might have to be made in the interests of security. TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

FC Barcelona Rugby to tour Japan with Messi and Co.

first_img Rugby World Cup Groups Expand The rugby side will not just be on the trip to rub shoulders with soccer heroes like Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Ivan Rakitic – the amateur team will be slated to scrum down with a number of local sides will in Japan.Before this grand Asian adventure the Barca rugby side, who are based at the La Teixonera ground, will also hope to climb up into the top four of their league in order to compete in the play-offs. They have won the league title twice in their history, netting back-to-back triumphs in 1953 and 1954. The soccer superstars will head to Asia alongside their amateur rugby side Five Spain Players Banned For Confronting Referee Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Five Spain players have been banned for confronting… Rugby World Cup Groupscenter_img A rundown of the Rugby World Cup groups… Five Spain Players Banned For Confronting Referee Expand Collapse FC Barcelona Rugby to tour Japan with Messi and Co.When Barcelona’s soccer superstars go on their summer tour of Asia this summer, they will be taking another sports side with them: Barca’s amateur rugby side.The FC Barcelona club is so much more than just La Liga giants, with the women’s team and men’s basketball famous branches of the world-renowned sports club. FC Barcelona Rugby have been part of that family since 1924, and they compete in the División de Honor de Rugby, Spain’s top club rugby competition. According to Spanish paper Sport, Barca’s soccer giants have decided to take the rugby side with them for the first leg of their tour, to Japan in July, for two reasons. Firstly, in honour of the Rugby World Cup being hosted in the Land of the Rising Sun from September until early November. And secondly, to commemorate the rugby club’s 95th year and the side making Copa del Rey final in later April – the side’s first visit to the showcase in almost 35 years. Happy Camp Nou: Barcelona’s soccer players celebrate a goal (Getty Images) Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Last summer Barcelona’s football side toured the United States of America and they took the professional women’s team with them.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for all the latest rugby news.last_img read more

World Rugby facing concussion lawsuit

first_imgThe eight players are part of a test group and their solicitor Richard Boardman, of Rylands Law, says he is representing more than 100 former professional players who are showing similar symptoms.In response to news of the legal case, World Rugby told BBC Sport: “While not commenting on speculation, World Rugby takes player safety very seriously and implements injury-prevention strategies based on the latest available knowledge, research and evidence.”Boardman says that the lawsuit is not only about financial compensation but making the game safer going forward. The players have also created a set of 15 health and safety commandments that they think should be implemented.The proposals include reducing contact training, limiting the number of substitutions in a game, improved testing and better aftercare.Seeking redress: Michael Lipman, here playing for Bath in 2007, is part of the group taking action (Getty)Ipek Tugcu, Senior Associate in the Brain Injury Team at Bolt Burdon Kemp, says: “To win, the players must prove that they suffered brain injuries because the defendants (World Rugby, RFU and WRU) failed to take reasonable steps to protect them from the known risk of brain injury. What is ‘reasonable’ will be determined by the information known, or ought to have been known, at the time of the events.“This is not easy and will require consideration of volumes of documents to identify what information was available on the risks at the time and evidence from independent medical experts regarding the link between the players’ brain injuries and any failings. It wouldn’t be unusual for this to take years. A legal action of this magnitude is bound to have significant implications for athletes, especially rugby players, suffering from brain injuries. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “If successful, it will set a precedent for others to come forward relying on the similar grounds. The impact on rugby’s governing bodies would be astronomical – the financial payouts per athlete could easily reach six-figure sums or more, as they will need to cover all injuries and financial losses suffered due to the injury.“Money aside, I would expect very swift and robust changes to be made to the game to fill in any gaps which could leave the governing bodies open to more legal action.” Former players plan to sue global governing body, the RFU and the WRU  Legal action: Steve Thompson has been diagnosed with early onset dementia (Getty Images) World Rugby facing concussion lawsuitWorld Cup winner Steve Thompson is one of eight former players who are planning to launch a legal action for negligence against World Rugby, the RFU and the WRU over the effects of concussion.All the players in the group, which also includes Alix Popham and Michael Lipman, are under the age of 45 and have been diagnosed with early onset dementia, which they believe is due to brain injuries suffered while playing rugby.Ex-England hooker Thompson cannot remember winning the World Cup in Australia in 2003 while former Wales international Popham’s memory loss led to him causing a fire at his home after he left the grill on.Lipman, 40, said: “This is something I will be battling forever and ultimately I won’t win. I am a walking time bomb. I feel like I am treading on eggshells with myself.”The players allege that given the significant risk of serious or permanent brain damage caused by concussions, World Rugby, RFU and WRU “owed them, as individual professional players, a duty to take reasonable care for their safety by establishing and implementing rules in respect of the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of actual or suspected concussive and sub-concussive injuries”.last_img read more

General Seminary partners with Church Center on social media

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Social Media, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By ENS staffPosted Feb 10, 2012 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK General Seminary partners with Church Center on social media New Digital Formation program focuses on mission and outreach Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Deborah Matherne says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Emergent Church, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Theological Education Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 10, 2012 at 9:54 pm What an exciting and timely opportunity to learn how to expand my sadly lacking social media skills. Working half the year from Honduras means that I really, really need these skills. I can’t wait to learn all I can here with my very first webinar. [Episcopal News Service] The General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church is working with the Office of Communication of the church’s denominational headquarters on a new education program called Digital Formation.The goal is to help clergy and lay leaders throughout the Episcopal Church appreciate the importance of understanding the use and effects of social media in the church as well as its theological foundations and implications, according to a seminary press release.The program begins with a series of webinars, each centering on a different topic related to social media. The first hour-long webinar starts at 1:00 pm EST on Feb. 17. Interested persons may register here. The program includes 45 minutes of content and a 15 minute question-and-answer session. The topics include:Feb. 17: introduction to the church and social media;March 2: social media as hospitality;March 16: what to tweet about;March 30: Foursquare and evangelism;April 20: mobile apps for churches;May 4: QR Codes in and around church.“The exponential growth of phenomena like Facebook, Twitter, and the use of various mobile devices challenge us to take not just a practical ‘how to’ approach but also to develop a serious theology of social media,” Colin Chapman who, along the Rev. Joseph P. Mathews, have guided the creation of the program, said in the release. Both are GTS students.“Formation is a part of our name because we hope to address not just technology, but also how we are shaped into the image of Christ, how we embody our Baptismal Covenant,” added Mathews.In an interview with Episcopal News Service, both Chapman and Matthews said they bring their faith online with them and it has served as a chance for them to evangelize in the world of social media.“I think what happens, particularly with people who are maybe somewhat newer to the Internet and social media, is that you can cheapen what happens online as not personal or less than personal,” Chapman said.But, he said, “when you acknowledge that the person on the other end of your Facebook wall is a person reflective of the incarnate nature of Christ it completely changes the church’s need to be involved because now we’re no longer dealing with digits and bits and images on a computer; but you’re dealing with Christ in the other.”Following the webinar series, Digital Formation will welcome the Rev. Matthew Moretz from Christ Church, Rye, New York, the host of the popular online video series “Father Matthew Presents.” Moretz will be on the GTS campus on Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. to discuss how social media has supported his own ministry and mission, as well as how others may use social media tools such as YouTube to highlight their own parish’s strengths. The public is invited and there is no charge.Matthews compared the evangelism possible through social media to the methods used by St. Paul when he founded early Christian communities.“In the first century, Paul got into a boat and went around the Mediterranean and built a community of people where they were. And he didn’t just say ‘You need to believe in Jesus” and then get back in his boat,” Matthews told ENS.Paul lived with the people, built up the community and the church and when he eventually did move on, “he stayed in the touch with the communities that he had planted and we have some of those letters now,” he said.“It’s important for churches to pay attention to social media because it’s where people gather,” he said, adding that much social interaction takes place online and noting the oft-repeated statistic that Facebook’s membership is equal to the third-largest country in the world.A short Episcopal Church-produced video about the impact of social media is here.“Another part of it for me is that as the church has lost a lot of its clout in the sort of post-Christian society that we’re living in, social media gives the church a platform to re-create intentional communities similar to those of the early church,” Matthews said. While early Christians might have been were living together and sharing houses, denizens of social media share news feeds to be connected to each other.“That enables a way to talk about discipleship and formation, which is why we’re talking about digital formation,” he added.Digital Formation will have a presence at General Convention this summer and has ambitious plans for additional training sessions on and off campus next year, according to the release.“Helping current and future leaders to understand social media underscores General’s commitment to an ever-increasing emphasis on the use of new technologies in the enterprise of theological education,” said the Rev. Lang Lowrey, the seminary’s president, in the release.The Church Center’s Office of Communications is working with Digital Formation to share expertise and technology in an effort to make some of the programming available on-demand to the wider church.“We are delighted to be working with GTS on this program,” said Anne Rudig, director of communication for the Episcopal Church.For more information about Digital Formation, email to [email protected] Digital Formation’s Facebook page, which includes a schedule of upcoming webinars and events, is here. The program can also be followed on Twitter at twitter.com/digiformation.last_img read more

Gay Jennings anuncia su candidatura a presidente de la Cámara…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 General Convention, Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 8, 2012 [Episcopal News Service] La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, que acaba de terminar un período de seis años en el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal, anunció el 5 de junio que se postula para presidente de la Cámara de Diputados.Jennings dijo en un mensaje en Facebook que tomó esa decisión “luego de haber orado mucho y de muchas conversaciones con episcopales de toda la Iglesia”.“Pido vuestro apoyo, ideas, participación y oraciones”, dijo ella, pidiéndoles a las personas que se le unieran en la página “para que podamos intercambiar ideas e interrogantes sobre la obra que Dios nos llama a realizar”.Jennings anunció también sus intenciones a través de una carta dirigida a los miembros de la Cámara de Obispos y a la lista de correos electrónicos de los diputados.“Me gustaría trabajar con ustedes y con otros líderes para cambiar nuestra manera de funcionar en el próximo trienio”, dice en la carta. “Para que la Iglesia Episcopal tenga importancia en el siglo XXI, tenemos que encontrar medios de avanzar juntos. Creo que Dios nos llama a abrazar un futuro sin más falsas opciones entre misión y gobierno. Sin falsas guerras entre individuos o grupos. Sin más forcejeo por autoridad o control”.Jennings dijo que, más que pedir el apoyo de los diputados, ella “esperaba que todos ustedes invertirán y participarán en la edificación de asociaciones colaborativas e interconectadas para la obra que Dios nos ha llamado a realizar en esta Convención General y en el próximo trienio”.Si resulta electa, Jennings prestaría servicios desde el fin de la reunión de la Convención General en Indianápolis, Indiana, del 5 al 12 de julio, hasta el final de la próxima reunión de la Convención General a celebrarse en Salt Lake City, Utah, en julio de 2015. Ella sucedería a Bonnie Anderson, que ha sido presidente de la Cámara de Diputados durante dos períodos de tres años.Anderson anunció el 23 de mayo que no le pediría a la Convención que la eligiera para un tercer y último período como presidente [de la Cámara de Diputados].La Cámara de Diputados aceptará nominaciones para la presidencia durante la próxima reunión de la Convención el 8 de julio, y la elección para el 32º. Presidente de la cámara tendrá lugar al día siguiente.El 10 de julio, la cámara recibirá nominaciones para vicepresidente, según información que puede encontrarse aquí. Ese cargo ha estado vacante desde el 15 de febrero de 2010, cuando Brian Prior, que era el vicepresidente, fue ordenado obispo.El vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados debe ser de un orden diferente al del presidente.La Cámara de Diputados incluye hasta ocho miembros con derecho a voto de cada una de las 109 diócesis de la Iglesia, una zona de misión y una convocación. La Convención General es uno de los cuerpos legislativos más grandes del mundo.El [o la] presidente de la Cámara de Diputados sirve como vicepresidente del Consejo Ejecutivo y de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera [DFMS, por su sigla en inglés] (la entidad corporativa de la Iglesia Episcopal). El [o la] presidente encabeza la Cámara de Diputados en la Convención General, nombra clérigos y miembros laicos de todas las comisiones permanentes y comités legislativos de la Convención, y realiza muchas funciones de enlace, desarrollo y oportunidades entre convenciones.El cargo no tiene salario, pero en el trienio 2010-2012 la Convención General aprobó un presupuesto (vea aquí el renglón 140-145) de alrededor de $589.000 para cubrir los gastos de Anderson, compensar al personal que la ayuda y cubrir los costos de mantener un consejo asesor, nombrado por la presidente.Desde que Anderson anunció su decisión de jubilarse, algunos observadores han comentado sobre cómo las exigencias del cargo podrían afectar económicamente a posibles candidatos.Jennings, de 61 años, vive en Sagamore Hills, Ohio, y ha sido directora asociada de CREDO Institute Inc. durante los últimos nueve años. CREDO ofrece toda una gama de materiales de conferencias y posconferencias que ayudan a las personas con derecho a participar del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia a examinar, evaluar y re-energizar su salud y bienestar.“Estoy trabajando para garantizar que tendré todo el tiempo necesario para dedicarme al cargo de Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados”, dijo Jennings a Episcopal News Service poco después de haber anunciado su intención de presentarse a elecciones.Antes de unirse a CREDO, Jennings prestó servicios como canóniga del ordinario en la Diócesis de Ohio durante 17 años. Fue ordenada al diaconado en 1978 y al presbiterado en 1979, y atendió parroquias en Virginia y Ohio a principios de su ministerio. Se presentó a la elección del obispo de la Diócesis de Virginia a principios de 2007, ocasión en que resultó electo el actual obispo Shannon Johnston.Ella está casada con el Rdo. Albert Jennings, rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Timoteo [St. Timothy’s] en Macedonia, Ohio, y deán de la zona de misión de Summit en esa diócesis.Jennings presidió el comité de Gobierno y Administración para la Misión del Consejo Ejecutivo durante los últimos tres años de su permanencia en el Consejo. Como parte de su trabajo, el comité tomó la iniciativa de revisar los estatutos de este organismo y el manual de la política de personal de la DFMS.Ella es también miembro clérigo de la delegación de la Iglesia Episcopal al Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, cuya próxima reunión este otoño es en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri.En inglés: http://bit.ly/LHijkF Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Tags Featured Events Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Gay Jennings anuncia su candidatura a presidente de la Cámara de Diputados Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem General Convention 2012, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET President of the House of Deputies Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

Boston-area Episcopalians gather for prayer, offer solace to neighbors

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (2) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Boston-area Episcopalians gather for prayer, offer solace to neighbors Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Boston Marathon Bombing Submit a Press Release Rev. Joel W Murchison says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group P. Parker says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Annie Packard, 13, sings during Trinity Episcopal Church Copley Square’s Eucharist at Temple Israel, which invited the congregation to use its sanctuary April 21in Boston. Trinity is within the blocked-off area near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, where two bombs exploded on April 15 as the race was ending. Packard was in the grandstands when the first bomb exploded and ran away in the direction of the second bomb, which went off 10 seconds later. AP Photo/Julio Cortez[Episcopal News Service] They all may not have been able to get to their churches, but in the hours after the second of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings was captured April 19, Episcopalians in the Boston area continued to support each other and their neighbors.Police captured Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, as he holed up in a boat parked in a backyard just blocks away from Church of the Good Shepherd in Watertown, Massachusetts. He was weakened by a gunshot wound after fleeing on foot from an overnight shootout with police that left 200 spent rounds behind.The Rev. Amy McCreath, Good Shepherd’s priest-in-charge, e-mailed her congregation shortly after the capture, calling the capture a “great gift.”“Your vestry met by conference call while events unfolded tonight, praying for all of you, for your children, and especially for our neighbors on Franklin Street,” she wrote.Good Shepherd was open during the day on April 20 for “prayer and companionship,” and Angelita Caceda was one member who came to the church the day after the internationally watched drama unfolded in her neighborhood. The evening before, she had been on the floor of her home as the bright light from a police search helicopter illuminated the room.“When I saw it was Franklin Street I said ‘that’s where I usually walk. I see that boat all the time,’” she told the Salem Patch website.McCreath said people came in the church and blurted out their experiences from the previous day. “They had it inside and needed to share it.”That evening about 300 people gathered on Watertown’s Victory Field for a vigil to remember the victims of the Marathon bombings.“This is one way everyday citizens can really give thanks to everyone that took care of us,” Mary Labadini, a 56-year-old elder care specialist who lives in Waltham and attended the vigil, told the Boston Globe. “You can’t thank them all individually, but this shows the sentiments of the public are with them.”Residents at the vigil swapped stories about the dramatic police action in their neighborhoods, including gun battles and methodical door-to-door searches by SWAT teams.Volunteers from a local Veterans of Foreign Wars post passed out American flags.Residents spontaneously sang the national anthem and other patriotic songs, recited the Pledge of Allegiance, and listened in silence as McCreath led an impromptu prayer of thanksgiving.Diocese of Massachusetts Thomas Shaw, SSJE, came to Good Shepherd on April 21 “as a sign to us of the prayers and companionship of the larger church,” McCreath told her parishioners.The church had healing ministers to pray with people during communion and a guided discussion during the Liturgy of the Word for children, “to help them process the events of the week and recover their calm and hope.”April 21 was the Fourth Sunday of Easter, is known as Good Shepherd Sunday because the gospel appointed for the day is John 10:22-30, a portion of the story in which Jesus calls himself the good shepherd who lays down his life for his sheep. Thus, it is the patronal feast day of congregations known as Good Shepherd.Members of Trinity Church Copley Square prepare for Holy Eucharist April 21 at Temple Israel. The parish members could not worship at Trinity because it is still cordoned off as investigators comb the area around the Boston Marathon finish line where two bombs exploded April 15. Photo/Trinity ChurchNot all Episcopalians could be in their church buildings for Good Shepherd Sunday. Trinity Church Copley Square, just yards from where the bombings occurred near the marathon’s finish line, is still off-limits because it is within the crime-scene boundaries investigators have set. The FBI allowed church officials a half hour on April 20 to go inside to gather vestments and the wine and bread for Eucharist, according to one report.The Temple Israel synagogue opened its doors to the congregation and Trinity’s congregation filled the 900-seat sanctuary. Rabbi Ronne Friedman told CNN that the synagogue was honored to host Trinity in an hour of need. “It was beautiful, moving,” he said. “And it was a reminder of the deep bonds that exist between us. It reminded us all that our proximity is not just geographical.“After the trauma of the past week, we are in proximate relationship with one another spiritually and psychologically. I think we all very much felt it was one Boston.”The Rev. Samuel T. Lloyd III, Trinity priest in charge, prayed for those who were slain “and for those who must rebuild their lives without the legs that they ran and walked on last week,” Yahoo News reported.“So where is God when the terrorists do their work?” Lloyd asked. “God is there, holding us and sustaining us. God is in the pain the victims are suffering, and the healing that will go on. God is with us as we try still to build a just world, a world where there will not be terrorists doing their terrible damage.”Debris still litters the streets near Trinity Church Copley Square six days after the Boston Marathon bombings. Photo/Trinity ChurchLloyd was among those priests and pastors who shared with Time magazine their thoughts about preaching on the Sunday after the six extraordinary days in Boston. He wrote that people had to name what the bombers tried to do to them and “name the way that has touched our spirits, and then talk about everything we are gathered to do on a Sunday, to care for each other, to remember the grace and mercy at the heart of everything day by day, and claiming the call to live that here and now. All of that is our answer to the terrorists’ efforts to undermine the fabric of our lives.”The service at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul near Boston Common included a prayer to the “Lord Christ, Risen Victim,” who “even on the cross you prayed for the forgiveness of those who murdered you.” The prayer in part asked that Christ would “remind us to pray for those who persecute us. Keep us aligned with your justice and not our own. Teach us to undo the cycles of violence and retribution and give us courage to act on our faith.”And, in London on April 20, the Rev. Jacqueline Cameron of the Diocese of Chicago preached for the London Marathon Dedication Service held at All Hallows by the Tower. The next day Cameron ran in the London Marathon for the second time and in her 14th marathon overall.The London event attracted much attention coming as it did six days after the attack in Boston and, as in Boston, many runners ran with pledges of support for various charities.“The potential healing power of events such as the London Marathon is at least as staggering as the power of violence,” Cameron said during her sermon. “We do need to remember pain. We do need to remember the suffering and the dead from Monday’s bombing and from all of the acts of violence and destruction that pepper human history. But also we need to learn how not to be burdened by bitterness or poisoned by a desire for revenge. And one of the best ways to do that is to allow our pain to spur us to acts of courage, of joy, and of compassion.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Tagscenter_img April 24, 2013 at 1:22 am I find the moment between that lovable young dancer whose left foot was severed by shrapnel and CNN’s Anderson Cooper spectacularly life-affirming, extraordinarily open, and revealing, and honest, and real! …. the rest of her years uncertain in the extreme!…..her career as dancer and instructor and mentor dangerously derailed! …..yet, the conspicuous lack of bitterness!…. the evident hope and grace that’s propelling her forward!……the confidence – despite her injury’s horror and injustice – that “the arc of history bends toward justice”….for me, this speaks loudly of the God of Holy Scripture:“gracious and merciful; full of compassion and forgiveness; slow to anger and abounding in loving-kindness” Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 22, 2013 at 8:26 pm Was their any damage to the foundations of Trinity as there was when the Prudential Building was erected. Will it be checked? New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 22, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Massachusetts announces nominees for bishop election

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 House of Bishops Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Posted Jan 15, 2014 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Bishop Elections, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Massachusetts announces nominees for bishop election Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Diocese of Massachusetts press release] The Standing Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts announced Jan. 15 its slate of nominees for election as bishop.  They are:The Rev. Holly Antolini, 61, rector, St. James’s Church, Cambridge, Mass.;The Rev. Ronald Culmer, 49, rector, St. Clare’s Church, Pleasanton, Calif.;The Rev. Alan Gates, 55, rector, St. Paul’s Church, Cleveland Heights, Ohio;The Rev. Ledlie Laughlin, 54, rector, St. Peter’s Church, Philadelphia, Penn.; andThe Rev. Sam Rodman, 54, project manager for campaign initiatives, Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts.More information about each of the nominees is available at http://mabishopsearch.org/candidates_for_bishop.A petition process for submitting additional names opens with and will close on Jan. 31.  Complete information about the petition process and the petition form are available at http://mabishopsearch.org/petition_process.The slate is the result of a seven-month discernment process conducted by a Discernment Committee comprising lay and clergy members from across the diocese and reporting to the diocesan Standing Committee. With the announcement of the slate, a Transition Committee, also comprising lay and clergy members from across the diocese, implements the next stages of the election process, also reporting to the Standing Committee.The nominees will participate in a series of open meetings around the diocese March 14-19, giving the people of the diocese an opportunity to meet and learn more about the nominees.  Details will be announced.The election will take place on Saturday, April 5 at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Boston.  All canonically resident clergy of the diocese and lay delegates (two elected from each of the diocese’s parishes and missions) vote separately as “orders”; a majority of votes on the same ballot from both the clergy and lay orders is required for election.Pending consent from a majority of the Episcopal Church’s diocesan bishops and a majority of dioceses (via their Standing Committees), the consecration of the bishop-elect is scheduled to take place on Saturday, Sept. 13 at the Agganis Arena at Boston University, with the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, presiding.The current bishop, the Rt. Rev. M. Thomas Shaw, SSJE, became the 15th bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts in January 1995. In preparation for retirement, he plans to resign his office at the time of the new bishop’s consecration in September.The Diocese of Massachusetts, among the Episcopal Church’s oldest and largest, in terms of baptized membership, comprises 183 parishes, missions, chapels and chaplaincies in eastern Massachusetts. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more