World Bank Prez Arrives in Liberia Today

first_imgWorld Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim is expected to arrive in Liberia today to further strengthen the Bank’s continuing response to the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD). Dr. Kim, a strong advocate for the global fight against the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, will meet President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and senior officials of the Liberian Government.He will be expected to reassure the government and people of Liberia of the Bank’s commitment to assist Liberia to achieve zero Ebola virus transmission. Dr. Kim, who is also a public health expert, will visit the Ebola Emergency Operation Center (EOC) in Monrovia and meet with the Incident Management System representatives, donor partners involved in the Ebola response, health workers, EVD survivors, contact tracers and burial team members. He will also hold a press conference today at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.The World Bank Group is mobilizing nearly US$1 billion in financing for the three countries hardest hit by the Ebola crisis. A total of US$518 million has been disbursed for the emergency response. The funding is helping Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone provide treatment and care, contain and prevent the spread of infections, help communities cope with the economic impact of the crisis, and improve public health systems, a statement from the World Bank said Monday.Additional financing of a US$285 million grant was approved by the World Bank Group’s Board on November 18, 2014, with a US$115 million allocation for Liberia.This money, the Bank observed, will help scale-up community-based care and support for faster identification, triage and care of Ebola patients, enable a surge of international health workers, laboratory services, and essential supplies, and restart basic health services.The International Finance Corporation (IFC), the private sector arm of the World Bank Group, is also providing commercial financing to enable trade, investment and employment in the three most affected countries, including Liberia. The financing includes a rapid response program which is helping to ensure continued operations of business and supplies of essential goods and services.Majority of the World Bank Group’s financing to the worst affected countries in West Africa is coming through the Bank’s International Development Association (IDA), which was established in 1960 to help the world’s poorest countries by providing grants and low to zero-interest loans for projects and programs that boost economic growth, reduce poverty, and improve poor people’s lives.IDA is one of the largest sources of assistance for the world’s 77 poorest countries, 39 of which are in Africa. Resources from IDA bring positive change for 2.8 billion people living on less than US$2 a day. Since 1960, IDA has supported development work in 112 countries. Annual commitments have averaged about US$18 billion over the last three years, with about 50 percent going to Africa.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

MESSENGERS OF PEACE

first_imgWe would like to begin the New Year on a high note by paying special tribute to all health care providers-medical doctors, nurses, clergymen and women, volunteers and others who lost their lives to the Ebola epidemic of 2014.We thank them for their sacrifices, display of valor, professionalism, selflessness and uncommon volunteer action that has inspired all of us. Because of their action and sacrifices, we look forward to 2015 with renewed energy and commitment believing that all interventions put in place in the fight against Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) would eventually lead to the eradication of EVD from Liberia.Building a lasting, multimedia memorial for those whose sacrifices provide us with a space to live would be a worthwhile project. As a nation, we need to commemorate the lives of those lost to EVD so as not to forget what we have been through and what lies ahead.Messengers of Peace (MOP)-Liberia takes this opportunity to call on Government of Liberia, International Organizations and Civil societies to provide the much needed coordination policy to end the fight against Ebola, to strengthen the health care system and to equip our schools with hygienic facilities and supplies. We can only improve the lives of those that have survived and honor the memories of those who lost their lives to the epidemic. According to Albert Camus in The Plague-“What is true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well; it helps men to rise above themselves.”Together, we have come this far. The concept of “it takes a village” is given further expression through such all-embracing action of our heroes and heroines. For us at MOP-Liberia, we are refreshed to know that our hard work, through the various community education outreach programme and weekly column has paid off and we remain committed and ready to develop programmes that protect young people, particularly children against all risks. We intend to go further on a new journey that leads to the prevention, control and eradication of EVD from Liberia.For a disease with such high fatality and social consequences as Ebola, the wise saying that prevention is better than cure makes cannot be overemphasized. It is on this premise that we would like to request the Government of Liberia to continue ensuring the safety of all our health care providers and volunteers risking their lives in the fight against the Ebola virus.On a related note, we are pleased that schools are scheduled to reopen next month and we are quick to caution that if there are no concrete steps to equip schools and educate the youth about EVD, as well as put in place the necessary precautionary measures, then the mediocrity that places us at risk will continue. A long term plan and strategy should be employed to guarantee the safety of our children.News of significant progress in the development of effective vaccines deserves our attention, particularly considering the expert opinion of their safety and we are optimistic that the treatment regimen, protocols and vaccines would make the difference.  Beyond the scientific breakthrough of Ebola vaccines, we must remember to address the issues surrounding the political sluggishness, unemployment, corruption and grossly inadequate healthcare infrastructure, among others, which constitute a drawback to the progress made so far.Until next week, when we come to you with another article on: “Notes of Forward Looking Interventions in the Fight against Ebola”, Peace First, Peace above all else, May Peace prevail on earth!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more