Newcomers Nazareth top Kiddy Cricket

first_imgScotiabank Kiddy Cricket newcomers Nazareth Primary, out of Manchester, dethroned defending champions Hastings, from Trelawny, on Friday at the cricket festival at Sabina Park, where the quarter-finals, semi-finals and final were held.In the final, Nazareth made 144 for four off their allotted 10 overs while Hastings replied with 133 for 5 in their 10 overs.The Scotiabank Kiddy Cricket competition is a modified version of the game, where each team plays ten overs on a smaller field and shorter pitch (18 yards). During the game, every player bowls, fields and bats. The fielders are rotated after each over. All teams must include at least four girls.Nazareth’s coach Dean Lalor was very elated to win the competition despite the challenges along the way. He pointed to the challenge of teaching the sport to the girls and including them in all the matches.Yanique Forbes-Patrick, vice-president of marketing at title sponsor Scotiabank, was very pleased with this year’s staging of the festival. She said that the fact that newcomers topped the competition showed that the programme works and that the kids are learning the sport well.Several players got awards after the final.The best bowler (female) award went to Kade Wilmoth of New Works and the male award went to Chrismar McDonald of Priory.BEST PLAYERSBest batter (female) was Annalese Johnson of Priory and the male awardee was Ethan Henry of Hastings.Best fielder (female) was Janeil Deer and the male, Jordane Morrison. Both players hail from Hastings Primary.The parish champions are St Mary – Goshen; St Catherine – St John’s; St Elizabeth – Barbary Hall; Westmoreland – New Works; St Ann – Priory; Clarendon – Brandon Hill; St Andrew – Duhaney Park; Portland – Windsor; St James – Cambridge; Hanover – Church Hill; Kingston – St Benedict; St Thomas – Middleton; Trelawny – Hastings; and Manchester – Nazareth.last_img read more

Appointment raises conflict questions

first_imgMayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s appointees to the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority include the head of the ACLU of Southern California, which has sued the city numerous times over homeless issues. The appointment of Ramona Ripston, made last week and referred to the City Council on Tuesday, prompted some council members to call for the city attorney to look at potential conflicts of interest stemming from the lawsuits. “I would be concerned there would be perceived or real conflicts of interest,” said Councilman Bernard Parks, who as a former chief of police was involved in some of the litigation. The mayor, himself a former local ACLU leader, does not believe there is a conflict that would keep Ripston from serving, his spokeswoman Diana Rubio said. Councilwoman Jan Perry has been criticized by the ACLU for supporting police sweeps aimed at homeless people downtown, the subject of some past litigation. Perry, who said such police action is sometimes necessary to bring services to the mentally ill, said that the money handled by the Homeless Services Authority is “inextricably intertwined with policy” on homelessness. Perry said she will seek a city attorney review of potential conflicts for both Ripston and Mirell. Councilman Eric Garcetti, who chairs the Housing, Community and Economic Development Committee, which will consider the nominations, said he will “keep an eye” on such conflict of interest reviews but that he considers Ripston to be an excellent appointee. “Some of the best, most qualified people for city posts have engaged in yesterday’s battles,” he said. “We have to see if today’s is a conflict, but we don’t want people who are so sanitary that they’ve never been involved in the issues they’re confronting.” Villaraigosa also tapped for the panel well-known former First AME Church pastor Cecil L. “Chip” Murray and University of Southern California administrator and former City Ethics Commission leader Rebecca Avila. Dan Laidman, (213) 978-0390 dan.laidman@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “Mayor Villaraigosa chose her because she’s informed and involved in the city and has long expressed concern for the homeless,” she said. “The mayor believes being informed about issues is a positive attribute.” Another mayoral appointee, Douglas Mirell, was a plaintiff’s attorney along with the ACLU in a 2000 case in which a federal judge limited the stopping of homeless people without probable cause by Los Angeles police. The American Civil Liberties Union has one outstanding homeless case against the city, Ripston said, that concerns an ordinance making it a crime for people to sleep on the street. The organization lost the case but is appealing. The litigation has been related to city policy, Ripston said, while the Homeless Services Authority, a joint city-county agency, provides funding and guidance to homeless service providers. “I just think there absolutely is no conflict and I’m surprised that they think there is,” she said. last_img read more