Letters to the Editor for Sunday, March 31

first_imgHe is determined to obliterate the political legacy of the first black man elected president. He is stuffing federal courts with partisan judges to impede investigations with impeachment potential.We are being led by an ignorant, self-absorbed, impulsive grifter. He praises our enemies and belittles our own intelligence experts while making decisions with global implications.Trump’s incompetence and poisonous intents endanger our nation at present and will haunt us long after he’s gone. Sadly to say, if asked the question: Is this the person you want for president of the United States, too many people would still say yes. George MilnerMechanicville Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionTrump: Incompetent, poisonous influenceTrump’s tweets are more crazed than ever. The realization may be setting in that there aren’t enough xenophobic white nationalists to keep him in office in 2020.That must terrify him. Without political clout and the shield of pardon power he and various family members are at risk of prosecution for financial frauds that might have gone undetected had he not become president. In an ongoing Twitter feud with Trump, Kellyanne Conway’s husband recently pointed out that Trump displays all of the outward signs of narcissistic and antisocial personality disorders.The main themes of this administration appear to be derivatives of these mental disorders, as well as Trump’s inability to recognize his own incompetence. He stokes the bigotry and feelings of victimhood of his base supporters to earn their adoration. As a matter of pure financial self interest, he pursues policies that benefit the wealthy. Sharon Springs fails to protect farmingFor all of the talk about saving farms and farmland, Sharon Springs recently lost an opportunity to save a real farm and a part of its rural character.The town of Sharon’s subdivision regulations give the planning board ability to require a conservation subdivision under certain circumstances, as when New York Land and Lakes proposed subdividing the 320-acre Key Farm.The conservation subdivision could have set aside a substantial portion of the total 320 acres as a farm, while allowing the subdivision of the remaining land. Four members of the planning board chose not to require the subdivider to preserve a portion of the farm as a farm. Sadly, we were accused of trying to prevent the farmer from selling his farm, which we couldn’t have done even if we’d wanted to. We were trying to help him sell the farm, to another farmer.After the subdivision was approved and the Keys were paid $490,000 by New York Land and Lakes (according to the Schoharie County Office of Real Property), an Amish family became interested in the farm. The subdivider entertained selling the entire farm to them and showed it to them twice. When the family offered the subdivider $750,000, the subdivider said they’d have to make it $800,000. When the Amish family agreed to that price, the subdivider declined and said they wanted to sell the farm as lots. We wish Sharon Springs loved farming as much as we hear it does.Scott and Kathie RyanGeorge and Kathy CraftRichard Van DykeJohn FunicelloSharon Springscenter_img But the best part was watching the diverse group of students who brought out the best in each other on their stage.It was a glimpse into what we could be as a society to see such support from the student body and the parents and grandparents all sitting there together watching this great show that took so much work and practice.Should we ever wonder why the music and drama departments are so needed in our schools today? When it comes time for budget votes, we should always remember how these students, no matter their place in the school, were all equal for two days on the stage, and all their hard work was appreciated by all the students as well as the community.There are very few areas in our schools today that can achieve this. Again, thank you for a wonderful time Scotia-Glenville drama and music.Denise CrisciScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? Play reinforces need for arts in our schoolsIt was our pleasure to have the opportunity to see “Mamma Mia “at the Scotia-Glenville High School this past weekend.The show was fantastic, the dance routines great and the vocals were spot on.last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Dec. 1

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionTrump, Netanyahu are on similar pathsThere are many similarities between the political situation in the United States and Israel.Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been accused of accepting bribes, fraud and breach of trust. He has been accused of providing regulators with millions of dollars as bribes to a leading Israeli website for favorable coverage of the prime minister and his family.He also wanted rough treatment of his political adversaries. It is ironic that Fox News supplies Trump with the latter at no charge.Israel’s Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit indicted Netanyahu for trading official favors, accepting bribes, fraud and breach of trust. Netanyahu even called the investigations and indictment a “witch hunt,” although Mr. Mandelblit belonged to the same party (Likud) and was Netanyahu’s cabinet secretary and closest adviser. Mr. Mandelblit said that the indictment of the prime minister was necessary because “Law enforcement is not a choice. This is not a choice of left or right. This is not a matter of politics.”It is about time that Attorney General William Barr stop debasing his position as AG by playing politics and acting as Trump’s private attorney. Do your job.Mark MarkovitzNiskayunaRetirees will regret loss of ObamacareThe Affordable Care Act: Republicans hate it and many Democrats don’t understand it.The truth is before the Affordable Care Act, Americans with “pre-existing conditions” had to pay unbelievable premiums for health insurance. Both young and old had to pay these high premiums, and companies like Mutual of Omaha, Travelers, Blue Shield and many others were making profits that were immeasurable.In my own case, my wife and I, after retiring before we turned 65, found that because we had minor pre-existing conditions, we had to pay upwards of $10,000 in premiums, and each of us had a $5,000 deductible before the insurance kicked in.Many of our friends were in the same boat once they stopped working. Many worked for companies that paid for their health insurance, and unionized workers received theirs through their union’s insurance and pension funds.Again, once retired, these same workers had to fend for themselves once COBRA ended. What senior citizen made it to retirement without some kind of pre-existing conditions? That hernia, back problem,or carpal tunnel injury, no matter how slight, is a “pre-existing condition.”The Affordable Care Act put an end to those with pre-existing conditions paying exorbitant premiums, as the Act’s best part was the provision that insurance companies had to accept them and couldn’t charge more than those without them. Many of those complaining about the Act had better pray it stays in effect. If the ACA gets repealed the “pre-existing conditions” provision goes away. God help us.Gary Philip GuidoRotterdamI see why evangelicals are drawn to TrumpA thought struck me as I was once again thinking about the seeming contradiction in the Christian evangelical acceptance of Trump as a heroic leader — or even a legitimate leader and patriot— and traditional Christian values.An epiphany: Their entire lives are spent trying to make the utterly ridiculous plausible. This explains their acceptance of an all-powerful and good god, who nonetheless allows horrible evil and injustice in the world, and the self-proclaimed ‘chosen one,’ whose personal, business and political history are a sordid story of corruption and racism.Anthony J. SantoRotterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18last_img read more

CSFB voted best analyst

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London takes lead in shift to mixed use

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Retail warehousing hits recession levels

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Nordic by nature

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Tats all, folks

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The tipping point

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Singapore president once backpacked in Yogyakarta, says royal

first_imgThe visit lasted in two hours, from around 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.Halimah was greeted by the Beksan Lawung Jajar sacred welcome dance, which was created by Sultan Hamengkubuwono I in 1755.During the official visit, the royals gave a tour of the palace by showing Halimah its historical objects, including a 19th century manuscript collection, leather puppets, a tea set from Sultan Hamengkubuwono VII as well as ancient kris daggers.The youngest princess, GKR Bendara, said Halimah seemed excited during the tour, especially with regard to historical objects linked to Sir Stamford Raffles, the founding father of modern Singapore.GKR Bendara said in the past Yogyakarta had around 300 ancient manuscripts, but during the rule of Sultan Hamengkubuwono III – from 1810 to 1811 and 1812 to 1814, Raffles took many manuscripts out of Yogyakarta that now are scattered around the world.GKR Bendara said Yogyakarta and Singapore had the potential to work together on exhibitions to commemorate Raffles in the future. (gis)Topics : Re-sharing Halimah’s story, GKR Mangkubumi said that Singapore’s first female president went on a budget trip to Yogyakarta, just like any backpacker. Halimah ordered her own tickets, visited the palace, and enjoyed a dance performance at Sri Manganti Hall in the palace, added the royal. Culture is one of Halimah’s biggest interests, hence the Yogyakarta trip, GKR Mangkubumi said.Wednesday’s visit was Halimah’s first visit to Yogyakarta as Singapore president.Yogyakarta Sultan Hamengkubuwono X and his wife, GKR Hemas, along with princesses GKR Mangkubumi, GKR Candrakirana, GKR Hayu and GKR Bendara welcomed Halimah, who was accompanied by husband Mohammed Abdullah Alhabshee, to the palace. A Yogyakarta princess has revealed that the President of Singapore Halimah Yacob enjoyed backpacking in Yogyakarta some time ago.Yogyakarta sultanate crown princess Gusti Kanjeng Ratu (GKR) Mangkubumi said that Halimah shared with the royal that she felt nostalgic when she visited the Yogyakarta Palace on Wednesday. The crown princess greeted the president on the said visit.“She said four years ago she went to Yogyakarta as a tourist,” the crown princess said on Wednesday as quoted by tempo.co. last_img read more

China virus toll hits 722, with first foreign victim

first_imgVice Premier Sun Chunlan, on a visit to quarantined Wuhan this week, instructed officials to take a “wartime” approach as they implement drastic measures that include combing the city for feverish residents.With panic spiralling around the globe — more than 320 cases have emerged in nearly 30 other countries — researchers were racing to find treatments and a vaccine to fight the virus.Hong Kong quarantine Hong Kong began enforcing a two-week quarantine for anyone arriving from mainland China, under threat of both fines and jail terms.Most people will be able to be quarantined at home or in hotels but they will face daily phone calls and spot checks.The financial hub has 25 confirmed cases with one patient who died earlier this week.The city has been on edge as the virus has revived memories of the SARS outbreak that killed 299 in the semi-autonomous city.Hong Kong officials hope the new measures will virtually halt the flow of people across the border while allowing the city to remain stocked with food and goods from the mainland.The SARS epidemic left profound psychological scars and saddled residents with a deep distrust of authorities in Beijing who initially covered up the outbreak.In the last week, Hong Kong has been hit by a wave of panic-buying with supermarket shelves frequently emptied of staple goods such as toilet paper, hand sanitiser, rice and pasta.The government has blamed unfounded rumours of shortages. Cruise ship quarantined Other governments around the world have hardened their defences, with several countries banning arrivals from China and advising their citizens to avoid travelling there.Major airlines have suspended flights to and from China.Asian cruise ships have become a focal point as dozens of cases have been confirmed on a vessel off Japan’s coast.Sixty-four people aboard the Diamond Princess off Yokohama have tested positive and passengers aboard the cruise ship have been asked to stay inside their cabins to prevent new infections.Another cruise ship carrying a passenger suspected of infection with coronavirus will not be allowed to dock in southern Japan, the government said.In Hong Kong, 3,600 people were confined aboard the World Dream, where eight former passengers have tested positive for the virus. Hero doctor On the mainland, the death Friday of a Wuhan doctor who was reprimanded by police after he had sent messages warning about the virus back in December sparked a rare outpouring of grief and anger on social media.Li Wenliang, an ophthalmologist who contracted the disease while treating a patient, was eulogised as a “hero” while people on Twitter-like Weibo railed against “fat officials” and demanded “freedom of speech”.Videos shared on Weibo showed a small group of people blowing whistles late Friday in front of a floral tribute to Li at Wuhan Central Hospital, where he died.As people across China fumed, the government expressed condolences and ordered an investigation. Wuhan’s government will award Li’s family 800,000 yuan ($114,000) in compensation covered by “work-related injury insurance”, according to the official Xinhua news agency. Scientists scramble Researchers, meanwhile, are scrambling to develop a drug to combat the virus.The US health department is working with pharmaceutical firm Regeneron to develop a treatment using a class of drug that has boosted survival rates among Ebola patients.Two weeks ago Chinese doctors confirmed they had been giving anti-HIV drugs to coronavirus patients in Beijing, based on a 2004 study published after the SARS outbreak that showed “favourable” responses.Scientists around the world are also working to develop a vaccine, which experts say could take months.Topics : A Japanese man in his 60s with a suspected coronavirus infection also died in hospital in Wuhan, the Japanese foreign ministry said, adding that it was “difficult” to confirm if he had the illness.The only fatalities outside the mainland were a Chinese man in the Philippines and a 39-year-old man in Hong Kong.Nearly 35,000 people have been infected by the new strain, which is believed to have emerged in a market selling wild animals in Wuhan last year before spreading across China.The epidemic has prompted the government to lock down cities home to tens of millions of people, as anger mounts over its handling of the crisis, especially after a whistleblowing doctor fell victim to the virus. The death toll from China’s coronavirus outbreak soared to 722 on Saturday, including the first foreign victim, as Hong Kong imposed a mandatory quarantine on mainland arrivals to block the spread of an epidemic that has caused global panic.With 86 more people dying in mainland China — the highest one-day jump so far — the toll was closing in on the 774 killed worldwide during the 2002-2003 SARS epidemic.A 60-year-old US citizen diagnosed with the virus died on Thursday in Wuhan, the city at the epicentre of the health emergency, according to the US embassy, which did not provide more details about the person.last_img read more